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Celebrating 240 years since 1776, adapted in part from Stories of Faith & Courage from the Revolutionary War (AMG)

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Liberty has been planted here, and the more it is attacked, the more it grows and flourishes,” Samuel Sherwood predicts to his Connecticut congregation.

January 1776

The year opens with the Continental Army, made up of militia, surrounding Boston by land, while the British military controls Boston and its harbor. The British began the siege in April 1775 after trying to take ammunition stores in nearby Lexington and Concord.

George Washington receives key intelligence

Jan. 7, 1776 
Leading the Continental Army through the authority of the Continental Congress, George Washington writes from Cambridge, Massachusetts, that he has “undoubted intelligence” of the British “embarkation of troops” to New York. But first he must rid Boston of the redcoats. Doing so will require cunning and surprise.

Thinking about Independence in 1776 was a matter of Common Sense

Jan. 9, 1776, Common Sense
“Tis time to part [from Britain],” declares the anonymous author of a new intriguing pamphlet called Common Sense, published for the first time. “The cause of America is in a great measure the cause of all mankind.”

Henry Knox. By owning the colonial equivalent of a “Barnes & Noble with a Starbucks,” Henry Knox was living the “American” dream in Boston in 1775. When the British seized Boston after Lexington & Concord in April 1775, Knox made a choice. He abandoned his bookstore and livelihood, slipped out of Boston with his wife Lucy, and joined George Washington and the patriot militia in Cambridge.

Henry Knox brings artillery

Jan. 24, 1776 
What 60-ton gift does Henry Knox give George Washington on this day? He brings 59 pieces of artillery that he hauled in winter from Fort Ticonderoga in New York to the Continental Army’s camp in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

“It is not easy to conceive the difficulties we had in getting them over the Lake [George], owing to the advanced season of the year, and contrary winds . . . it was very uncertain whether we could have gotten them over until next spring; but now, please God, they shall go,” Knox had written Washington in December 1775. His men had built “42 exceedingly strong sleds” and acquired “80 yoke of oxen to drag them.”


Celebrating 240 years since 1776, adapted in part from Stories of Faith & Courage from the Revolutionary War (AMG)

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJune  |  JulyAugustSeptember  |  October  |  November  |  December


Jane Hampton Cook's TV segments relating to the American Revolution

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